Torin/Darren WhoEver (wolfieboy) wrote,
Torin/Darren WhoEver
wolfieboy

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Battleground God

I took the following quiz a while back but I just haven't gotten around to posting it.

Battleground God

I received 1 direct hit and 1 bitten bullet. I, of course, think the answers that I came up with make perfect sense.

Direct Hit 1

You answered "True" to questions 10 and 14.

10. If, despite years of trying, no strong evidence or argument has been presented to show that there is a Loch Ness monster, it is rational to believe that such a monster does not exist.
True
14. As long as there are no compelling arguments or evidence that show that God does not exist, atheism is a matter of faith, not rationality.
True

You've just taken a direct hit!
Earlier you agreed that it is rational to believe that the Loch Ness monster does not exist if there is an absence of strong evidence or argument that it does. No strong evidence or argument was required to show that the monster does not exist — absence of evidence or argument was enough. But now you claim that the atheist needs to be able to provide strong arguments or evidence if their belief in the non-existence of God is to be rational rather than a matter of faith.
The contradiction is that on the first occasion (Loch Ness monster) you agreed that the absence of evidence or argument is enough to rationally justify belief in the non-existence of the Loch Ness monster, but on this occasion (God), you do not.

I think that the absence of evidence of a physical thing (Loch Ness monster) is significantly more meaningful than the absence of evidence of a non-physical thing/concept (that of Divinity).

Bitten Bullet 1

You answered "True" to questions 7, and 15.

7. It is justifiable to base one's beliefs about the external world on a firm, inner conviction, regardless of the external evidence, or lack of it, for the truth or falsity of these convictions.
True
15. The serial rapist Peter Sutcliffe had a firm, inner conviction that God wanted him to rape and murder prostitutes. He was, therefore, justified in believing that he was carrying out God's will in undertaking these actions.
True

You've just bitten a bullet!
You are consistent in applying the principle that it is justifiable to base one's beliefs about the external world on a firm, inner conviction, regardless of the external evidence, or lack of it, for the truth or falsity this conviction. The problem is that it seems you have to accept that people might be justified in their belief that God could demand something terrible.
This is something many religious people are willing to accept. For example, Kierkegaard believed that it is precisely because Abraham had to contravene established morality to follow God's will and attempt to sacrifice his son which made his act the supreme act of faith.
But as Kierkegaard also stressed, this makes the act incomprehensible from a rational point of view. The rational alternative - that people should require more than such an inner conviction to justify such a belief — is more attractive to most people, but you reject this alternative and bite the bullet.
It is justifiable to base one's beliefs about the external world on a firm, inner conviction, even in the absence of any external evidence
for the truth of these convictions.
The serial rapist Peter Sutcliffe had a firm, inner conviction that God wanted him to rape and murder prostitutes. He was, therefore justified in believing that he was carrying out God's will in undertaking these actions.

I'd prefer if people would base their beliefs about the external world on firm, inner convictions rather than the pre-chewed regurgitated crap that so many people seem to espouse. But just because I think you should have such beliefs doesn't mean that I'll agree with them or even allow such actions. I have a firm, inner conviction that no one should rape and murder anyone. Just because this fellow thought he was carrying out God's will doesn't make his actions right.
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